Month: January 2015

January 30, 2015, by Harold Varmus, M.D. Precision Medicine: Discovering unique therapies that treat an individual’s cancer based on the specific abnormalities of their tumor. This is a transformational moment for cancer research. Thanks to the investment by Congress in NCI and NIH research, we have arrived at a new understanding of cancer. We now
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Yes, knocking boots counts as exercise—and it sure beats the gym! Depending on how physical you get, sex can strengthen muscle tone, increase your heart rate, and get your whole body working, says Justin Lehmiller, PhD, creator of lecturer in the department of psychology at Purdue University and author of The Psychology of Human Sexuality.
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January 16, 2015, by NCI Staff Color-enhanced, electron micrograph image of a biofilm-covered, right-sided colon cancer. Purple coloring shows rod-shaped bacteria embedded in mucus strands (yellow). Used with permission from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (DOI 10.1073/pnas.1406199111). Credit: Cynthia Sears, Johns Hopkins Among the various environmental factors believed to contribute to colorectal cancer
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January 13, 2015, by NCI Staff Fusobacterium necrophorum—which normally inhabitants the pharynx, gastrointestinal tract, and female genital tract—may play a role in the development and progression of colorectal cancer. Changes in the gut microbiome could help distinguish individuals with healthy colons from those with either colorectal adenomas (polyps with a risk of becoming cancer) or
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January 7, 2015, by NCI Staff NCI’s Centers for Disease Control and Prevention 2014 Report on  Smokeless Tobacco and Public Health: A Global Perspective. For more than half a century, following the 1964 report of the Surgeon General, Smoking and Health, scientific research and global tobacco control efforts have been directed against cigarette smoking. But
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January 6, 2015, by NCI Staff Three-dimensional structure of a melanoma cell Sriram Subramaniam, NCI Comparing the treatment options available to patients with an advanced form of the skin cancer melanoma today and those available just 5 years ago is “like night and day.” That’s how Dr. Howard Streicher of NCI’s Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program
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