Month: March 2015

“When fatigued, you’re not able to control the muscles of the eye as well,” says Steven Shanbom, MD, an ophthalmologist in Berkley, Mich. First, skimping on shuteye tires out the ciliary muscle, which helps your eyes focus. The result: you’ll have a harder time reading up close, Dr. Shanbom says. Then there’s the extra ocular
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March 31, 2015, by Malcolm A. Smith, M.D., Ph.D. Malcolm A. Smith, M.D., Ph.D.Associate Branch Chief, PediatricsNCI Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program Challenges to childhood cancer researchers moving forward are to go beyond 90 percent survival for diseases like acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and to find cures for those cancers for which we still have no
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March 30, 2015, by NCI Staff Today, NCI, the American Cancer Society (ACS), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and the North American Association of Central Cancer Registries (NAACCR) issued the Annual Report to the Nation. This report is one of several regularly released reports that provide information on important cancer trends in
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March 27, 2015, by NCI Staff Neuroblastoma may be found in the adrenal glands and paraspinal nerve tissue from the neck to the pelvis. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved dinutuximab (Unituxin™) as part of first-line therapy for children with high-risk neuroblastoma—the first approval of a therapy specifically for patients with the high-risk
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March 24, 2015, by NCI Staff As part of its Exceptional Responders Initiative, NCI continues to reach out to the oncology community. The initiative is collecting cases in which patients with any cancer had dramatic and long-lasting responses to standard and experimental treatments that were not seen in similar patients who received the same treatment.
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March 24, 2015, by NCI Staff On March 4, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved nivolumab (Opdivo) to treat patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) that has progressed during or after treatment with platinum-based chemotherapy. Nivolumab, which was initially approved for the treatment of metastatic melanoma, is the first immunotherapy drug to
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March 24, 2015, by NCI Staff Specific DNA changes in a tumor may help determine which patients are most likely to respond to treatment with PD-1 inhibitors, according to findings from a new study by researchers at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center. The FDA has approved two PD-1 inhibitors: nivolumab (Opvido) and pembrolizumab (Keytruda). Both
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March 9, 2015, by NCI Staff At the recent annual Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI) in Seattle, several NCI researchers and NCI-funded investigators presented new findings on HIV-related cancers. While the conference was fairly wide-ranging, some of the more interesting and clinically applicable findings evolved around a better understanding of AIDS-related malignancies, explained
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March 2, 2015, by NCI Staff The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved lenvatinib (Lenvima) to treat some patients with the most common type of thyroid cancer, differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC). The approval is for patients with DTC whose disease has progressed following radioactive iodine therapy (radioactive iodine-refractory disease). Although the incidence of thyroid
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Abstract The concept that excess superoxide production from mitochondria is the driving, initial cellular response underlying diabetes complications has been held for the past decade. However, results of antioxidant-based trials have been largely negative. In the present review, the data supporting mitochondrial superoxide as a driving force for diabetic kidney, nerve, heart, and retinal complications
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Introduction It is now recognized that glycemic management in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) should be stratified with respect to choice of glucose-lowering agents and HbA1c targets (1,2). This comes about with increasing realization of the marked heterogeneity in patients with T2D with respect to pathophysiology, stage of disease, and comorbidities (1–4). Importantly, this
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