Month: January 2016

January 29, 2016, by NCI Staff Two types of gold nanoparticles spiked with spherical nucleic acids. Researchers are testing these nanoparticles as cancer therapies and diagnostic tools. Credit: National Cancer Institute NCI recently released the Cancer Nanotechnology Plan 2015. In this interview, Piotr Grodzinski, Ph.D., director of NCI’s Office of Cancer Nanotechnology Research, discusses the
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January 28, 2016, by NCI Staff The Preparatory Education About Clinical Trials (PRE-ACT) program includes targeted video clips that address patients’ specific concerns and knowledge gaps. Credit: American Society of Clinical Oncology Educating patients with cancer about clinical trials prior to their first visit with their oncologist can improve their ability to make decisions about
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January 25, 2016, by NCI Staff Mutant versions of the p53 tumor suppressor protein can clump together, stopping them from functioning. Treatment with ReACp53 can prevent this aggregation and restore p53’s function. Researchers have developed a new approach for treating tumors that express mutant versions of the p53 protein, which are present in more than
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January 21, 2016, by Douglas R. Lowy, M.D. President Obama has tapped Vice President Biden to lead a major new cancer research initiative. Credit: The White House As many in the cancer community are aware by now, during his State of the Union address to Congress last week, President Obama gave a strong endorsement of Vice
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January 19, 2016, by NCI Staff A dividing lung cancer cell. Credit: National Institutes of Health The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved alectinib (Alecensa®) on December 11, 2015, for some patients with metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with mutations in the ALK gene. The agency granted an accelerated approval for alectinib for patients whose cancer
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January 15, 2016, by NCI Staff Acalabrutinib (ACP-196) targets BTK, a key switch in a signaling pathway required for the growth and survival of chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells. Credit: Adrian Wiestner, M.D., NHLBI Reports from two early-stage trials of new oral drugs provide hope for patients with high-risk chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) that has returned
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Signs of a toxic relationship are sometimes easy to spot—blatant infidelity or physical violence, for example. But there can often be more subtle signs that something’s just not right between you and your partner—or between you and a close friend, a coworker, or a family member. (It’s not just romantic relationships that can become toxic.)
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January 12, 2016, by NCI Staff The genes PDGFRA and FIP1L1 are normally confined to separate loop domains (A) and rarely interact, but they can become closely associated (B) in tumors with IDH mutations. Credit: Broad Communications / Lauren Solomon Researchers studying brain tumors have identified a previously unknown genetic mechanism that may contribute to
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January 6, 2016, by NCI Staff The FDA recently approved three new drugs to treat multiple myeloma. One of the drugs is the first approved cancer therapy to target the CD38 protein (pictured). Credit: Wikimedia Commons / Emw, CC-BY-SA-3.0 The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved three new drugs for the treatment of multiple myeloma
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