Month: April 2016

SATURDAY, April 30, 2016 (HealthDay News) — A combination of face-to-face taunting and cyberbullying may greatly increase the risk that victims will become bullies themselves, a new study suggests. “Students who are victimized are more likely to exhibit aggressive behaviors towards others,” said study principal investigator Alexandra Hua, from Cohen Children’s Medical Center of New
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April 29, 2016, by Dinah Singer, Ph.D. At last week’s annual meeting of the American Association for Cancer Research, Vice President Biden’s historic address to more than 4,000 researchers in attendance made clear that he and President Obama agree with many of us in the research community: We are at a critical juncture where the
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MONDAY, April 25, 2016 (HealthDay News) — Bed bugs have favorite colors, new research has discovered. In a series of experiments, researchers noted that the little blood suckers strongly preferred red and black and avoided green and yellow. Does that mean it’s time to redecorate your bedroom in colors these pests don’t like? It’s probably
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April 22, 2016, by NCI Staff Androgen receptor (AR) in cells regulates the activity of several cancer-related genes. Signaling through AR is the chief means by which prostate cancer cells grow and spread. Credit: Open-i (CC BY 2.0) Researchers have identified a potential alternative approach to blocking the activity of a key molecular driver of
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April 20, 2016, by Douglas R. Lowy, M.D. Vice President Joe Biden, speaking at the American Association for Cancer Research 2016 annual meeting. Credit: AACR/Todd Buchanan We’re coming off an exciting week for the cancer research community and the ongoing efforts behind the Vice President’s National Cancer Moonshot Initiative. The big event, which took place
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April 19, 2016, by NCI Staff Pembrolizumab targets a protein on immune cells called PD-1, one of a family of so-called checkpoint proteins that can restrain the immune response. Credit: National Cancer Institute / Terese Winslow In a small clinical trial, more than half of the patients with an aggressive form of skin cancer called
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April 14, 2016, by NCI Staff Vitamin D is obtained from food and supplements or produced by the body in response to sun exposure. Credit: iStock A deficiency in vitamin D is associated with tumor progression and metastasis in breast cancer, suggests a new study. The study, primarily conducted using cell lines and mice, also
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April 13, 2016, by NCI Staff Credit: National Cancer Institute Based on the results of a new study, NCI is launching a clinical program called ClinOmics, which will use genomic approaches to help guide the treatment of patients with cancer who are treated at the NIH Clinical Center. In this interview, Javed Khan, M.D., of
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April 11, 2016, by NCI Staff Red blood cells (blue arrow) adjacent to an iNPG-pDox nanoparticle (red arrow) that is attached to a tumor microvessel. Credit: Haifa Shen, Ph.D., Houston Methodist Research Institute Researchers have developed and tested a new injectable nanoparticle-generating technology that can deliver doxorubicin (Adriamycin®), a commonly used chemotherapy drug, straight to
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April 7, 2016, by NCI Staff People with familial adenomatous polyposis develop hundreds of polyps in the colon, rectum, and duodenum. Credit: National Cancer Institute In a small clinical trial of people with an inherited condition that greatly increases the risk of developing gastrointestinal cancers, a two-drug combination has been shown to shrink duodenal polyps,
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FRIDAY, April 1, 2016 (HealthDay News) — Mindfulness training can trigger brain changes that help veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) manage disturbing memories and thoughts, according to a new study of war veterans. The goal of mindfulness training is to help people develop in-the-moment attention and awareness. This study included 23 U.S. veterans of
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