Month: December 2016

December 30, 2016, by NCI Staff Many gene fusions, including the MLL-AF4 fusion, are formed when pieces from two different chromosomes trade places, known as a translocation. Researchers have created a long-sought-after mouse model for the most common form of infant leukemia, an aggressive form of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) for which prognosis is poor.
0 Comments
December 28, 2016, by NCI Staff A breast tumor (green and blue) with a cluster of slow-growing treatment-resistant cells (red). Credit: National Cancer Institute NCI’s cancer information products are constantly evolving and growing, so periodically we provide updates on new content of interest to the cancer community. Overcoming Cancer Treatment Resistance For many patients, cancer drugs eventually stop working.
0 Comments
December 21, 2016, by NCI Staff A pathology slide of a gastrointestinal stromal tumor Credit: CC-BY-SA-3.0 (Copyright ® 2011 Michael Bonert) Two early-phase clinical trials testing new targeted therapies for advanced gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) have produced promising preliminary results. Both therapies are designed to shut down an aberrant molecular signaling pathway that drives most
0 Comments
1. Sampson, H. A. et al. Food allergy: a practice parameter update-2014. J. Allergy Clin. Immunol. 134, 1016–1025 (2014). 2. Muraro, A. et al. EAACI food allergy and anaphylaxis guidelines: diagnosis and management of food allergy. Allergy 69, 1008–1025 (2014). 3. Boyce, J. A. et al. Guidelines for the Diagnosis and Management of Food Allergy
0 Comments
A new year symbolizes a fresh start—and the perfect chance to reboot your stale workouts with one of 2017’s top fitness trends. In the upcoming year, wearable tech, body weight training, and high-intensity interval training (HIIT) will be huge, according to an annual report published by the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM). The 11th
0 Comments
December 16, 2016, by NCI Staff Credit: National Institute of Mental Health, National Institutes of Health To survive and grow, brain cancer cells are heavily dependent on a constant supply of cholesterol provided by other brain cells, a new study suggests. Moreover, the researchers found that brain cancer cells take in more cholesterol than normal
0 Comments
The start of every health kick can be a glorious time, with your motivation at its highest and the fitness gains at their easiest to come by. Your muscles might be aching, and your diet could be missing a few unhealthy favourites, but the weight will be dropping off like nobody’s business. At some point,
0 Comments
The world is full smart kit these days – smartphones, smart watches, smart central heating, smart TVs, etc. – it’s like you can’t throw a stone (not that we’re condoning throwing stones) without hitting something smart! And while it’s easy to question the genuine usefulness of some of this smart tech, one thing that’s undeniably
0 Comments
December 13, 2016, by NCI Staff Researchers have found that individual tumor cells collected from the blood of patients with multiple myeloma can reveal genetic changes associated with the cancer. Credit: Broad Communications Individual tumor cells circulating in the blood of patients with multiple myeloma may be a new source of information about the genetic
0 Comments
Getty Images/iStockphoto Thinkstock Images Stefan Redel Studies have correlated the increased incidence of atopic dermatitis with rising levels of air pollution, but the mechanisms involved are not clear. Hidaka et al. now report that air pollutants can activate the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) in keratinocytes to induce the expression of type 2 cytokines and the
0 Comments
December 9, 2016, by NCI Staff Daratumumab attaches to a protein called CD38, which is present on the surface of cells, including in high numbers on myeloma cells. Credit: Johnson & Johnson The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved two new uses for the drug daratumumab (Darzalex®) in patients with multiple myeloma. Daratumumab was
0 Comments
Searching for some fitness inspo? Look no further… Most of us check our phones first thing in the morning before considering if we should roll out of bed into the cold and head for the gym. Unless our personal trainer is holding us accountable we easily skip workouts and still expect results. With the darker
0 Comments
December 6, 2016, by NCI Staff A normal neutrophil (left) next to a neutrophil that has released a trap (right) that captures and kills pathogens. A new study suggests that these latter types of neutrophils, called NETs, can promote cancer metastasis. Credit: Mikala Egeblad, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Cancer cells are infamous for recruiting normal
0 Comments
A recent study published in the Journal of American Medical Association Pediatrics observed a clinically significant association between exposure to mouse allergens and an increase in asthma symptoms as well as diminished lung function. Asthma is a pervasive health concern in the United States, however, asthma tends to disproportionately affect low-income groups and minorities residing
0 Comments
December 1, 2016, by NCI Staff Cytotoxic T cells (red) attacking an oral squamous cancer cell (white). Immune checkpoint inhibitors like nivolumab prevent tumors from turning off T cells, allowing them to attack and kill the tumor cells. Credit: National Cancer Institute The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved nivolumab (Opdivo®) on November 10 for
0 Comments