Month: January 2018

Injecting minute amounts of two immune-stimulating agents directly into solid tumors in mice can eliminate all traces of cancer in the animals, including distant, untreated metastases, according to a study by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine. The approach works for many different types of cancers, including those that arise spontaneously, the study
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The risks of hooking up when you’re coming down with the flu virus. Turn on the news right now, and you’ll hear horror stories about this season’s flu, one of the more virulent strains the U.S. has seen in recent years. Also crappy: Flu cases continue to rise at a time when all we want to do is
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In a recent study, researchers determine whether financial incentives would improve breastfeeding rates in a UK population. Although breastfeeding and its numerous effects on a newborn’s well-being have long been established as being extremely beneficial, financial incentives could have greater effects on improving breastfeeding rates in communities where breastfeeding rates are low. This study, published
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Do your palms sweat when you walk down a poorly lit street at night? That feeling may be traced to the firing of newly identified “anxiety” cells deep inside your brain, according to new research from neuroscientists at Columbia University Irving Medical Center (CUIMC) and the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF). The researchers found
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European researchers used two large population studies to determine how paternal depression symptoms may influence depression symptoms in teens. According to lead researcher Gemma Lewis, the incidence of depression increases markedly around 13 years of age with a majority of adults confirming their initial depressive symptoms occurring around the same time during adolescence. A mother’s
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Fever during the first trimester of pregnancy is thought to lead to severe congenital malformations in children. Sass and colleagues recently investigated the links between fever during pregnancy and congenital malformations in a Danish cohort.   Fever is typically the body’s response to fight off infection. It consists of an increase in body temperature, which
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(1836) British physician and surgeon John Cheyne passes away. He was one of the first individuals to recognize Cheyne–Stokes respiration, an abnormal breathing pattern caused by a number of conditions including heart failure and narcotic poisoning.   (1944) American-born writer, actress, comedian and psychotherapist Connie Booth is born. Although most famously-known
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Rutgers engineers have invented a “4D printing” method for a smart gel that could lead to the development of “living” structures in human organs and tissues, soft robots and targeted drug delivery. The 4D printing approach here involves printing a 3D object with a hydrogel (water-containing gel) that changes shape over time when temperatures change,
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Scientists have redesigned an adenovirus for use in cancer therapy. To achieve this they developed a new protein shield that hides the virus and protects it from being eliminated. Adapters on the surface of the virus enable the reconstructed virus to specifically infect tumor cells. Viruses have their own genetic material and can infect human
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Houston Methodist researchers have a new explanation for what causes the lungs’ airways to close during asthma attacks that could change the lives of the 300 million people worldwide who suffer from asthma. The discovery holds promise for developing a new class of drugs that is radically different from the steroids currently used to treat
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Researchers in China investigated whether combining old-world herbal remedies with today’s pharmaceuticals could slow cognitive decline in Alzheimer’s patients. Alzheimer’s disease is a neurodegenerative condition characterized by the accumulation of toxic proteins in the brain, leading to cognitive decline, loss of memory, and dementia. It is estimated that nearly 50 million people worldwide may be
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A new study from the U.K. suggests mindfulness strategies may help prevent or interrupt cravings for food, cigarettes, and alcohol. Craving can be defined as an intense, conscious desire, usually to consume a specific drug or food. There is also a significant body of research that suggests it is causally linked to behavior. Investigators reviewed
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A new study suggests that contrary to popular opinion, psychiatric medications are not overprescribed for American kids. In fact, because of limited access to child psychiatrists, researchers worry more about undertreatment and a failure to explore other means of treatments before medications. Investigators from Columbia University Irving Medical Center (CUIMC) compared prescribing rates with prevalence
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A landmark new research study found that surgically inserting electrical wires into the frontal lobes of the brains of patients with Alzheimer’s disease appears to slow functional decline and improve quality of life. Scientists at the Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center said their research was aimed at slowing the decline of problem-solving and decision-making
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Is a gluten-free diet healthy for someone who doesn’t have celiac disease or gluten-sensitivity? A gluten-free diet is recommended for people with celiac disease, gluten-sensitivity or the skin disorder dermatitis herpetiformis. A gluten-free diet may be helpful for some people with irritable bowel syndrome, the neurological disorder gluten ataxia, type 1 diabetes and HIV-associated enteropathy.
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I’ve heard that salmon is high in dangerous PCBs. So what are PCBs and what risk do they pose? Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are industrial chemicals that were manufactured from 1929 until 1979 when they were banned. PCBs have been shown to cause adverse health effects, including potential cancers, and negative effects on the immune, nervous
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I’ve heard that sharing meals as a family can have health benefits. Is weight control one of them? Eating at home may have health benefits, such as eating healthier food, but if your family watches TV or other electronic screens during meals, you might be losing out on any weight-control benefit. A recent study looked
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By Mayo Clinic Staff Dietitian’s tip: This is a great way to add more flavorful vegetables to your diet. Other cruciferous vegetables, such as cauliflower or Brussels sprouts, can be substituted for broccoli. Number of servings Serves 4 Ingredients 4 cups broccoli florets 1 teaspoon olive oil 1 tablespoon minced garlic 1
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Can heartburn drugs lead to vitamin B-12 deficiency? Some studies have found an association between prescription heartburn medications and increased risk of vitamin B-12 deficiency. Prescription medicines to treat heartburn, also called gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), work by suppressing stomach acid. It now appears that blocking stomach acid and other secretions may also block B-12
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