Children

WASHINGTON—Glucocorticoids, a class of steroid hormone medications often prescribed to patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), offer long-term benefits for this disease, including longer preservation of muscle strength and function and decreased risk of death. These findings support the standard prescribing practices in many clinics and could help sway parents who are on the fence
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WASHINGTON—With a $2 million gift from James A. “Jim” MacCutcheon and his family, Children’s National Health System has established the MacCutcheon Family Professorship in Cardiac Critical Care Medicine to ensure world-class care for children in the cardiac intensive care unit (CICU). The gift was made by Mr. MacCutcheon and his daughters, Megan MacCutcheon, Candice Kessler,
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A comprehensive review of research on several measures of the quality of early childhood education suggests that the instructional practices of preschool teachers have the largest impact on young children’s academic and social skills. The review helps untangle a complicated knot of factors that affect young children. “High quality preschool is one of the most
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WASHINGTON – Today Children’s National Health System became the first pediatric medical institution in the United States to receive accreditations for both immune effector cells and more than minimal manipulation from the Foundation for the Accreditation of Cellular Therapy (FACT). Considered the threshold for excellence in cellular therapy, FACT establishes standards for high-quality medical and
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During the fetal stage, millions of neurons are born in the walls of the ventricles of the brain before migrating to their final location in the cerebral cortex. If this migration is disrupted, the new-born baby may suffer serious consequences, including intellectual impairment. What happens, however, if the migration takes place but is delayed? Researchers
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Some expectant parents play classical music for their unborn babies, hoping to boost their children’s cognitive capacity later in life. While some research supported a link between prenatal sound exposure and improved brain function, scientists had not identified any structures responsible for this link in the developing brain. A new study led by University of
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Relational factors in music therapy can contribute to a positive outcome of therapy for children with autism. It might not surprise that good relationships create good outcomes, as meaningful relational experiences are crucial to all of us in our everyday life. However, the development of a relationship with a child with autism may be disrupted
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SAN FRANCISCO ─ A particularly aggressive form of pediatric cancer can be spotted reliably by the genetic fragments it leaves behind in children’s biofluids, opening the door to non-surgical biopsies and providing a way to gauge whether such tumors respond to treatment, according to an abstract presented by Children’s National Health System researchers during the
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Premature infants are at risk for a broad spectrum of life-long cognitive and learning disabilities. Historically, these conditions were believed to be the result of lack of blood flow to the brain. However, a new study published in the Journal of Neuroscience, finds that while limited blood flow may contribute, major disturbances are actually caused
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Every person has a distinct pattern of functional brain connectivity known as a connectotype, or brain fingerprint. A new study conducted at OHSU in Portland, Oregon, concludes that while individually unique, each connectotype demonstrates both familial and heritable relationships. The results published today in Network Neuroscience. “Similar to DNA, specific brain systems and connectivity patterns
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With their brains, sleep patterns, and eyes still developing, children and adolescents are particularly vulnerable to the sleep-disrupting effects of screen time, according to a sweeping review of the literature published today in the journal Pediatrics. “The vast majority of studies find that kids and teens who consume more screen-based media are more likely to
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Researchers in Italy explored whether or not the childbirth method determines the quality of breast milk. Maternal breast milk that is first secreted after giving birth is called colostrum. Colustrum is rich in various components including antibodies, mineral salts, and hormones. Colostrum provides babies with their first protective defences allowing them to adapt to the
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WASHINGTON – Children’s National Health System announces that Adelaide Sherwood Robb, M.D., will become the chief of the Division of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences within The Center for Neuroscience and Behavioral Medicine. Dr. Robb also serves as a professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at the George Washington University School of Medicine & Health Sciences,
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About Children’s National Health System Children’s National Health System, based in Washington, D.C., has been serving the nation’s children since 1870. Children’s National is #1 for babies and ranked in every specialty evaluated by U.S. News & World Report including placement in the top 10 for: Cancer (#7), Neurology and Neurosurgery (#9) Orthopaedics (#9) and Nephrology (#10). Children’s National
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WASHINGTON – Continuously recording the brain’s electrical signals and examining how those impulses evolve over time is a more reliable way to identify infants at risk for brain injury, compared with doing snapshot evaluations, according to a prospective cohort study led by Children’s National Health System research-clinicians. Amplitude-integrated electroencephalogram (aEEG) is a bedside tool that
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WASHINGTON—A novel tool developed by researchers at Children’s National Health System–with critical input from transgender youth and their parents–assesses the level of interest or concern these teens and their families have regarding the impacts of medical gender treatments on long-term fertility.  The Transgender Youth Fertility Attitudes Questionnaire and its pilot study appear in the Journal of
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Researchers studied whether complete blood cell count (CBC) tests are accurate in identifying invasive bacterial infections in babies under two months old. Babies with fevers are often seen in hospital emergency departments to check whether they have serious bacterial infections such as urinary tract infection, bacteremia (blood infection), or bacterial meningitis (infection of the membranes
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WASHINGTON – (October 19, 2017) – Children’s National Health System received the 2017 HIMSS Enterprise Davies Award for outstanding achievement in improving the lives of children through the use of health information technology.  Since 1994, the HIMSS Nicholas E. Davies Award of Excellence has recognized outstanding achievement of organizations that have utilized health information technology
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Recent studies determine whether public smoking bans decrease the amount of children being admitted to the hospital for lower respiratory tract infections. Smoking has a direct impact on the respiratory system. The toxins and carcinogens found in cigarettes travel along the respiratory tract and can lead to both benign and malignant diseases at any point
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A recent study determined whether there is a relationship between childhood obesity and risk of stroke in adulthood. Childhood obesity is a rising health concern that has reached epidemic proportions throughout the world. Obese children have a high risk of developing health problems as adults. One of the major health concerns related to childhood obesity
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WASHINGTON─Macrophages, a type of white blood cell involved in inflammation, readily take up a newly approved medication for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and promote its sustained delivery to regenerating muscle fibers long after the drug has disappeared from circulation, an experimental model study led by Children’s National Health System researchers finds. The study, published online
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Iron-deficiency anemia affects millions of people around the world. Although iron-deficiency anemia is usually easily treated, it may cause impaired neurodevelopment in young children if left untreated. American researchers, therefore, determined whether ferrous sulfate can effectively resolve iron-deficiency anemia in children. Iron-deficiency anemia (IDA) occurs when the body’s iron stores become diminished. This leads to
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