Drugs

In a recent article published in The Lancet Neurology, researchers from Hamburg, Germany summarize what is currently known about cluster headaches. Cluster headaches are characterized by headache attacks causing pain on one side of the head, lasting for 15–180 minutes and occurring up to eight times a day. Unlike a migraine headache where individuals seek
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Iron is important to enable healthy physical and cognitive development in infants and children. Researchers recently examined the literature concerning the risks and benefits of iron supplementation in African children and the side effects of iron supplements.   Iron deficiency is common in Sub-Saharan children and carries serious potential risks. In fact, as many as
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In a major advancement in nanomedicine, Arizona State University (ASU) scientists, in collaboration with researchers from the National Center for Nanoscience and Technology (NCNST), of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, have successfully programmed nanorobots to shrink tumors by cutting off their blood supply. “We have developed the first fully autonomous, DNA robotic system for a
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Current anxiety and depression guidelines recommend continuing therapy for six to 24 months. However, relapse after discontinuing antidepressant medications is common. Researchers examined whether the risk of relapse was higher in anxiety patients who discontinued antidepressant medications or those who did not. The most commonly used treatment for anxiety and depression is antidepressant medications. Chronic
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Epidural analgesia often prolongs the second stage of labour. Researchers recently investigated whether the woman’s position after an epidural during the second stage of labour affects the chances of a spontaneous vaginal delivery. Epidural analgesia is considered the most effective pain relief for women during labour and is chosen by 30% of women who give
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McMaster University engineers have devised a way to make testing for new drugs more efficient and affordable, and reduce the time for helpful medications to reach the public. Chemical Engineering Associate Professor Todd Hoare and Rabia Mateen, a PhD candidate in Biomedical Engineering, have created a printed paper-based device that can speed up and improve
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A recent study published in the British Medical Journal determines whether there is a correlation between the occurrence of rainfall and achy joints. It is widely believed that changes in the weather can contribute to the intensity of back and joint pain, especially for patients diagnosed with arthritis. Previous research on the topic, however, has
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Researchers in Switzerland have revealed new findings in BMC Gastroenterology on the relationship between inflammatory bowel disease and wellbeing in children. Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) is a rare chronic and debilitating illness characterized by cycles of disease activity and remission. IBD is associated with a series of signs and symptoms ranging from bloody diarrhea to symptoms
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The ability for cancer cells to develop resistance to chemotherapy drugs — known as multi-drug resistance — remains a leading cause for tumor recurrence and cancer metastasis, but recent findings offer hope that oncologists could one day direct cancer cells to “turn off” their resistance capabilities. New findings put forth by University of Maryland Fischell
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A recent study published in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, the researchers compared the effect of individualized nutrition therapy that is provided by a dietitian with the effect of dietary advice from other healthcare professionals. Nutrition therapy is considered to be an integral part of treating type 2 diabetes. It is the application of
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Biomedical engineers have developed a miniature self-sealing model system for studying bleeding and the clotting of wounds. The researchers envision the device as a drug discovery platform and potential diagnostic tool. A description of the system, and representative movies, were published Tuesday online by Nature Communications. Lead author Wilbur Lam, MD, PhD says that blood
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Most cancer deaths are caused by recurrent or metastatic tumors. Conventional therapies target rapidly dividing tumor cells, but are unable to eradicate the highly chemoresistant tumor initiating cells (TICs), ultimately responsible for relapse and spreading of the tumors in other parts of the body. A team of researchers at the Center for Self-assembly and Complexity,
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A recent article in Science discusses how antabuse, a drug with a long history of treating alcoholism, finds new applications in fighting cancer. Antabuse (disulfiram) has been used to treat alcoholism for decades. It discourages alcohol abuse by provoking nausea when consuming even small amounts of alcohol. Case reports and lab studies dating back to
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Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), affecting more than 11% of people worldwide, causes abdominal pain, bloating, and irregular bowel movements. A recent clinical trial in Norway investigated whether fecal transplants could restore a healthy gut microbiome and relieve irritable bowel syndrome symptoms. Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) causes abdominal pain, bloating, and abnormal frequency and consistency of
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Over-the-counter pain medicine such as Ibuprofen and acetaminophen may influence how people process information, experience hurt feelings, and react to emotionally evocative images, according to recent studies. Examining these findings and how policymakers should respond, a new article is out today in Policy Insights from the Behavioral and Brain Sciences, a Federation of Associations in
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A study published in BMC Research Notes reported results on how First Nations women compared to Caucasian women concerning perceived physical and mental health. First Nations, or Indigenous peoples, are the first inhabitants of what is now known as Canada. They currently make up around 4% of Canada’s population. Several health studies have been conducted
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A study from Denmark examines the relationship between psychiatric disorders in children and a history of homelessness in their parents. Children and adolescents that come from socially disadvantaged backgrounds struggle with health problems compared to those from higher socioeconomic backgrounds. Social status and placement are suggested to have the largest effect on a child’s health
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