Mental Health

Common childhood infections, including those that result in numerous absences from school, do not appear to negatively impact children’s brains or their ability to do well in school, according to a new Danish study at Aarhus University. In recent years, research has focused on how children develop and perform intellectually following serious illnesses and hospitalizations.
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A new study finds that young children tend to prefer sweets over other types of snacks when they are feeling more emotional. For example, the findings show that children aged four a half to nine years chose chocolate candy over goldfish crackers more frequently in response to both sadness and happiness — particularly sadness. For
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Neuroscientists at the University of Toronto Scarborough have developed an imaging technique that can reconstruct images of what people perceive based on their brain activity gathered by EEG. Specifically, the new method is able to digitally reconstruct images seen by test subjects based on electroencephalography (EEG) data. “When we see something, our brain creates a
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New research suggests the impact of cell phones is dependent upon many variables, including the vulnerability of the teen. Researchers attempted to answer the question of whether the next generation will be better or worse off because of smartphones? They discovered the answer is complex and often dependent on an adolescents’ life offline. The research
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A new Finnish study finds that people with major depressive disorder (MDD) may have reduced bioavailability of the amino acid arginine. In the body, arginine turns into nitric oxide (NO), a powerful neurotransmitter and immune defense mediator that improves circulation and helps blood vessels relax. A person’s global arginine bioavailability ratio (GABR) is an indicator
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Relating to oneself in a healthy way can help weaken the association between perfectionism and depression, according to a study published February 21, 2018 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Madeleine Ferrari from Australian Catholic University, and colleagues. Perfectionistic people often push themselves harder than others to succeed, but can also fall into the
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New research suggests an important part of treatment for young mental health patients — especially those in a hospital setting — is improving how they perceive themselves, according to a study from the University of Waterloo. Researchers found that youth with psychiatric disorders receiving inpatient services reported lower self-concept — particularly global self-worth — compared to those receiving
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Despite widespread concern among parents and educators, using social media may not adversely impact teens’ academic performance, according to a new study in Educational Psychology Review. “Concerns regarding the allegedly disastrous consequences of social networking sites on school performance are unfounded,” said Professor Markus Appel, a psychologist who holds the Chair of Media Communication at Julius-Maximilians-Universität
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It’s said that, “When you hit rock bottom, there’s nowhere to go but up.” That can prove especially true in business, where bottoming out after job loss can be necessary before finding the radical solution that will lead to a new work identity, according to new research from the University of Notre Dame. “When you
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Emerging research suggests excess levels of calcium in brain cells may lead to the formation of toxic protein clusters that characterize Parkinson’s disease. Parkinson’s disease is one of a number of neurodegenerative diseases caused when naturally occurring proteins fold into the wrong shape and stick together with other proteins. The proteins in turn eventually form
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Researchers at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), have developed a new method to predict whether a person with obsessive compulsive disorder would benefit from cognitive behavioral therapy. Obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) is a challenging, life-long mental health disorder marked by repetitive thoughts and actions that can seriously impair work performance, relationships, and quality
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Researchers have successfully reversed the formation of amyloid plaques in the brains of mice with Alzheimer’s disease, thereby improving the animals’ cognitive function. Investigators from the Cleveland Clinic Lerner Research Institute discovered that gradually depleting an enzyme called BACE1 eliminates the plaques. The study, which appears in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, raises hopes that
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A new Canadian study finds that many elementary school children who read below grade level have challenges with their eyesight — even if standard tests say their vision is 20/20. Researchers from the University of Waterloo found that one-third of a group of children with reading difficulties tested below-normal in binocular vision. Healthy binocular vision
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A new study finds that schizophrenia patients with auditory hallucinations often hear what they expect to hear. In fact, the hallucinations may be an extreme version of a perceptual distortion quite common among healthy people. Research has long established that people who experience hallucinations and other psychotic symptoms tend to have elevated dopamine, but the
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Screening all adults for hepatitis C (HCV) is the most cost-effective way to identify more people with the disease as well as improve patients’ health and quality of life, compared to the current recommendations of screening only certain populations. Hepatitis C is a viral infection that causes liver inflammation and sometimes serious liver damage. Many
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New research has discovered that conversation between an adult and a child appears to change the child’s brain. In a study of children between the ages of four and six, cognitive scientists at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology found that differences in the number of “conversational turns” accounted for a large portion of the differences
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A new study contradicts the notion that social media has created “social displacement” — the alienation of people from friends and family in favor of Facebook and Twitter. Published in the journal Information, Communication & Society, the study finds no evidence for the proposition that social media crowds out face-to-face communication with those who ought to
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New research finds that a romantic relationship helps buffer lesbian and gay youth from the negative effects of bullying and victimization. Furthermore, being involved in a relationship helps to significantly reduce psychological distress among gays and lesbians. Conversely, relationship involvement among bisexual youth increased psychological distress. The Northwestern Medicine study, conducted in collaboration with the
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