Mental Health

A new study published in Biological Psychiatry: Cognitive Neuroscience and Neuroimaging reports that processing of negative emotion can be strengthened or weakened by tuning the excitability of the right frontal part of the brain. Using magnetic stimulation outside the brain, a technique called repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS), researchers at University of Münster, Germany, show
0 Comments
A two-minute questionnaire for parents can provide meaningful insights that help pediatricians and other primary care providers detect autism in toddlers. Early detection of the disorder at this neurodevelopmental stage is critical for enhancing outcomes. Researchers at Rutgers New Jersey Medical School say the Psychological Development Questionnaire (PDQ-1), developed at Rutgers, has an 88 percent
0 Comments
A new study finds the mental health of middle-aged individuals may be surprisingly robust. Finnish investigators used a unique data set where a group of nearly 370 people have been followed from age eight to 50. They discovered that over time, four groups of mental well-being emerged. The novel data set was the product of
0 Comments
Researchers in Canada examined whether childhood health behaviours predicted a later diagnosis of adolescent internalizing disorders. Mental health continues to be a burden across the globe. Approximately one in four people will experience one or more episodes of poor mental health in their lifetime. Half of all cases of poor mental health occur during adolescence.
0 Comments
Emerging research may have discovered the method by which psychological stress impacts physical health. Scientists believe the key may be the way in which stress affects the mitochondria region of a cell, often called a cell’s “powerhouse.” Experts believe the new understanding could potentially revolutionize the field of psychosomatic medicine. Two articles found in the
0 Comments
Canadian researchers have developed a new algorithm which allows first responders and home care providers to better assist the elderly during natural disasters. Older adults living at home face disproportionally high death rates during natural disasters, according to the World Health Organization. For instance, 71 percent of the deaths tied to Hurricane Katrina involved people
0 Comments
Researchers investigate the effects of light therapy on sleep disturbances and depression in older adults with mild cognitive impairments from dementia. Pathological changes in the brain can lead to mild cognitive impairment followed by dementia. This mild cognitive impairment is a transitional stage between healthy aging and dementia and is characterized as impairment in one
0 Comments
New research suggests that financial literacy helps people make better saving and investment decisions. The financial activity often enhances wealth accumulation which appears to lessen anxiety about life in old age. Investigators from Hiroshima University say the study is the first of its kind to examine how understanding about money influences anxiety about life in
0 Comments
Is a person’s moral behavior directly tied to his or her performance at work? Most people believe it is, according to a new study published in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology. “Although arguments can be made that an individual’s moral behavior is, or should be, irrelevant to their overall competence, we found consistent
0 Comments
Emerging research suggests declines in IQ during early childhood and adolescence can lead to psychotic episodes in adulthood. Investigators theorize that declining IQ causes children and young adults to fall progressively behind their peers across a range of cognitive abilities. Researchers from King’s College London’s Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN), and Icahn School
0 Comments
New research suggests federal regulations and policies such as the Violence Against Women Act should be extended to include dating relationships. Investigators from the University of Pennsylvania discovered the majority of intimate partner violence — more than 80 percent of incidents in one study population — involve boyfriends and girlfriends. What’s more, these partnerships result in the
0 Comments
In a new study, researchers set out to investigate why children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) tend to be less socially communicative than their typically developing (TD) peers. Their findings, published in the journal Molecular Autism, provide a glimpse into the brain mechanisms behind autism. In recent years, scientists have proposed several hypotheses to help
0 Comments
Do your palms sweat when you walk down a poorly lit street at night? That feeling may be traced to the firing of newly identified “anxiety” cells deep inside your brain, according to new research from neuroscientists at Columbia University Irving Medical Center (CUIMC) and the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF). The researchers found
0 Comments
A new study from the U.K. suggests mindfulness strategies may help prevent or interrupt cravings for food, cigarettes, and alcohol. Craving can be defined as an intense, conscious desire, usually to consume a specific drug or food. There is also a significant body of research that suggests it is causally linked to behavior. Investigators reviewed
0 Comments
A new study suggests that contrary to popular opinion, psychiatric medications are not overprescribed for American kids. In fact, because of limited access to child psychiatrists, researchers worry more about undertreatment and a failure to explore other means of treatments before medications. Investigators from Columbia University Irving Medical Center (CUIMC) compared prescribing rates with prevalence
0 Comments
A landmark new research study found that surgically inserting electrical wires into the frontal lobes of the brains of patients with Alzheimer’s disease appears to slow functional decline and improve quality of life. Scientists at the Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center said their research was aimed at slowing the decline of problem-solving and decision-making
0 Comments
Listening to motivational music has become a popular way of enhancing mood, motivation, and positive self-evaluation during sports and exercise. New research, however, finds that such music may help to encourage risk-taking and even boost self-esteem, but does not improve overall performance by itself. The effect was more noticeable among men and participants who selected
0 Comments