New research suggests an important part of treatment for young mental health patients — especially those in a hospital setting — is improving how they perceive themselves, according to a study from the University of Waterloo. Researchers found that youth with psychiatric disorders receiving inpatient services reported lower self-concept — particularly global self-worth — compared to those receiving
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Classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL) has a cure rate of about 75% with standard chemotherapy. Its nearly universal genetic alterations, furthermore, likely contribute to its unique sensitivity to PD-1 blockade. Most non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHL) do not, however, have the same genetic alterations as cHL, and are consequently much less susceptible to PD-1 blockade. A newly published
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Despite widespread concern among parents and educators, using social media may not adversely impact teens’ academic performance, according to a new study in Educational Psychology Review. “Concerns regarding the allegedly disastrous consequences of social networking sites on school performance are unfounded,” said Professor Markus Appel, a psychologist who holds the Chair of Media Communication at Julius-Maximilians-Universität
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It’s said that, “When you hit rock bottom, there’s nowhere to go but up.” That can prove especially true in business, where bottoming out after job loss can be necessary before finding the radical solution that will lead to a new work identity, according to new research from the University of Notre Dame. “When you
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50% of patients do not take their medicines as prescribed. What can we do about it? Jennifer K. Bussell, MD, FACP, is an expert who speaks nationally to the Institute for Healthcare Improvement on improving medication adherence and is involved in developing the medication adherence module for the AMA’s STEPS Forward Program. Q:
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Alcohol use disorders are the most important preventable risk factors for the onset of all types of dementia, especially early-onset dementia. This according to a nationwide observational study, published in The Lancet Public Health journal, of over one million adults diagnosed with dementia in France. This study looked specifically at the effect of alcohol use
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Levels of a protein found in the brain called alpha-synuclein (α-syn) are significantly lower than normal in cerebrospinal fluid collected in Parkinson’s disease patients suffering from postural instability and gait difficulty, a study led by movement disorders experts at Rush University Medical Center has found. The results recently were published online in the journal Movement
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Tohoku University researchers have improved on currently available methods for screening drugs for heart-related side effects. The method involves fabricating a tiny hole in a silicon chip over which lipid membranes, similar to those that surround cells, are encouraged to grow. An ion channel is then synthesized separately and knocked into the membrane during centrifugation.
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Almost all cells in the human body have identical DNA sequences, yet there are 200-plus cell types with different sizes, shapes, and chemical compositions. Determining what parts of the genome are read to make protein and which are silenced is orchestrated by proteins called transcription factors. These regulate the availability of distinct stretches of DNA
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A recent study evaluated the effectiveness of introducing weight management programs to help treat and potentially make a clinical difference in patients with diabetes. Given that type 2 diabetes is associated with obesity, a recent study published in Diabetes Obesity and Metabolism investigated whether the introduction of a weight management program has the potential to
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Physicists have devised a new method of investigating brain function, opening a new frontier in the diagnoses of neurodegenerative and aging related diseases. This new non-invasive technique could potentially be used for any diagnosis based on cardiovascular and metabolic-related diseases of the brain. The researchers at Lancaster University (UK) and Medical University of Gdansk (Poland)
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February 20, 2018, by NCI Staff Photoacoustic image showing oxygen (red) in tumor tissue after microbubble delivery.  Credit: John Eisenbrey, Ph.D., Thomas Jefferson University A new study in mice raises the possibility that microscopic, oxygen-carrying bubbles may help to improve the treatment of breast cancer. In the NCI-supported study, researchers used these “microbubbles” and ultrasound
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In cancer research, there has been a tendency to differentiate between the genes responsible for tumour development and those that give rise to metastasis and to study these processes separately since the cell functions required for these two mechanisms differ radically. Researchers headed by Jordi Casanova at the Institute for Research in Biomedicine (IRB Barcelona)
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